Sat | Oct 24, 2020

Grade seven students bag CSEC principles of business

Published:Tuesday | September 29, 2020 | 12:12 AMJudana Murphy/Gleaner Writer
Sameerah Dyer of the Madrasatul Bayt Institute in Spanish Town, St Catherine, got a grade one with distinction in CSEC principles of business in grade seven.
Sameerah Dyer of the Madrasatul Bayt Institute in Spanish Town, St Catherine, got a grade one with distinction in CSEC principles of business in grade seven.
Grade seven student Salama Abdul-Majeed of the Madrasatul Bayt Institute in Spanish Town, St Catherine, got a grade two in CSEC principles of business.
Grade seven student Salama Abdul-Majeed of the Madrasatul Bayt Institute in Spanish Town, St Catherine, got a grade two in CSEC principles of business.
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Grade seven students Sameerah Dyer and Salama Abdul-Majeed are over the moon about their performance in the recent Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) exams as they aced principles of business with a grade one with distinction and a grade two, respectively.

The two are among four grade seven students who passed the subject at the Madrasatul Bayt Institute (MBI), an Islamic school on Windsor Road in Spanish Town, St Catherine, which has been around for just seven years. This year, it had its first batch of students sitting external examinations.

The school started with a batch of grade one students who, after sitting the Primary Exit Profile exams, completing grade six, opted to continue their education at MBI, pleased with their performance and sold on the school’s vision.

Thirteen-year-old Dyer told The Gleaner that her principles of business teacher – who is also her mother – believed that she could handle principles of business.

“I was ecstatic to learn I got a distinction. My parents were extremely proud of me. My mom was crying and could hardly breathe,” she related.

In the 2021 sitting, Dyer will be attempting four more CSEC subjects – principles of accounts, mathematics, English A, and food and nutrition – while she tackles the grade eight curriculum.

“Our teachers always encourage us to do our best and put our trust in the Creator. Success lies with Him. We do our part and He does the rest,” said Dyer, who wants to follow in her uncle’s footsteps to become an economist.

At 11 years old, Abdul-Majeed was the youngest among the exam cohort and said that while sitting the exam was not her choice, she had no regrets.

Now 12 years old, she said that her teacher saw her ability years ago and had advised her to skip grade two and proceed with grade three.

Abdul-Majeed was relieved and excited at receiving a grade two in the CSEC exam. Her parents are even more delighted.

“It was stressful but manageable, with my older brother, who also sat the CSEC exam and got a grade one,” the pre-teen told The Gleaner of the preparations.

MBI director and tutor Taariq Abdul-Majeed was overjoyed at the students’ performance.

“They demonstrated that with discipline and hard work, age is just a number. I’m even more excited about their future than ever before,” he said, pointing out that students sit subjects on the recommendation of teachers.

“We have a staggered system where they start the CSEC syllabus from grade seven upwards and the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination syllabus in Grade 10,” he explained.

As an offshoot of the students’ performance, literacy, computer studies, and CSEC mathematics and English classes will be offered free of cost to the community.

judana.murphy@gleanerjm.com