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Seville missed out on a medal in 100m as Lyles completes first half of sprint double

Published:Monday | August 21, 2023 | 12:06 AMDaniel Wheeler/Staff Reporter
Jamaica’s Oblique Seville (left) narrowly misses out on a podium position in yesterday’s men’s 100 metres final at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.  Seville placed a close fourth behind Zharnel Hughes (right) of Great Brit
Jamaica’s Oblique Seville (left) narrowly misses out on a podium position in yesterday’s men’s 100 metres final at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary. Seville placed a close fourth behind Zharnel Hughes (right) of Great Britain who claimed bronze. American Noah Lyles (centre) took gold in 9.83 seconds. Letsile Tebogo (not in photograph) of Botswana was second. The second-, third-, and fourth-place finishers were all given the same time, 9.88 seconds.
Jamaica’s Hansle Parchment (centre) competing in heat one of the men’s 110m hurdles at the 2023 World Athletics Championships yesterday. Parchment won the heat in 13.30 seconds and secured his spot in the semi-finals.
Jamaica’s Hansle Parchment (centre) competing in heat one of the men’s 110m hurdles at the 2023 World Athletics Championships yesterday. Parchment won the heat in 13.30 seconds and secured his spot in the semi-finals.
Jamaica’s Rasheed Broadbell reacts after falling in heat three of the men’s 110m hurdles at the morning session of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, yesterday. Broadbell was one of the favourites for the gold medal in the eve
Jamaica’s Rasheed Broadbell reacts after falling in heat three of the men’s 110m hurdles at the morning session of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, yesterday. Broadbell was one of the favourites for the gold medal in the event.
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BUDAPEST, Hungary:

He thought he had it. Jamaica thought he had it.

But by a fraction, Oblique Seville was edged out of a first 100-metres World Championships medal. And the margins by which he lost out left him lost for words. But also it left him more motivated than ever to claim the prize after a season with difficulty.

Seville clocked 9.88 seconds in the men’s 100m final yesterday finishing fourth in a race that saw two other men, Letsile Tebogo who came second and his Racers Track Club training partner Zharnel Hughes who finally got his first major global championship medal, finishing third in the same time. Noah Lyles claimed the world 100m title in a world-leading 9.83. Ryeim Forde who made it to his first World Championships final finished eighth in 10.08.

It was too close to call initially at the line. And when Seville saw the official result, it left him stunned.

“I knew that I was very close. I thought that I came third because I didn’t see Tebogo in the picture. Because I only saw Lyles and Zharnel. But when I saw that Tebogo came second I knew I came fourth because Zharnel was a little bit ahead of me and I felt it,” Seville said.

But while the disappointment is there a year after finishing fourth in his first World Championships final last year in Oregon, Seville said that given how difficult his season has been, he is encouraged by how close he is to the goal, equalling his personal best in the earlier rounds after getting back to full fitness.

“If I have to be frank with myself. I am disappointed. But also I have to give credit to myself because I know that everyone didn’t expect me to run that fast in the (earlier round). It is something amazing again even though I have done it before,” Seville said.

Forde who made his first World Championships final is also buoyed by how much he has grown having set multiple personal bests this year.

“No regrets. But there are a lot of things to work on. It was a good experience, being here for the first time. You have to take notes, learn and try again,” Forde said. Rohan Watson did make the final with his 10.07 not fast enough in the semi-finals.

Meanwhile, the quartet of World Championships 100m silver-medallist Shericka Jackson, defending world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, Natasha Morrison and Sashalee Forbes all progressed to today’s semi-finals of the women’s 100m after strong outings. Jackson clocked 11.06 to win her heat. Fraser-Pryce clocked 11.01 to win hers while Natasha Morrison (11.02) and Sashalee Forbes (11.12) placed second and third, respectively, to advance.

The end of the morning session saw a major shock for Commonwealth Games 110m hurdles champion Rasheed Broadbell who clipped the penultimate hurdle and did not finish the race. Broadbell had the fastest time in the world this year leading up to the world championships.

Olympic 110m hurdles champion Hansle Parchment progressed to the semi-finals winning his heat in 13.30 despite a slow start. But Parchment says he is not worried as he is keen to get it right when it really counts.

“I am not really beating up myself about the start. In the finals, I will leave my best start for them because that is when I will really need it,” Parchment said. Orlando Bennett qualified among the sixth-fastest times after finishing fifth in his heat in 13.39.

ATHLETES ON TO SEMIS

It was a good day for the Jamaican men and women in the 400m as they all progressed to the semi-finals. National champion Sean Bailey clocked 44.98 seconds to finish third in his heat while World Championships debutant Antonio Watson won his heat in 44.77. Zandrion Barnes was third in his heat in 45.05. National champion Nickisha Pryce won in her World Championships debut clocking 50.38 and Candice McLeod finished third in her heat in 50.37. Charokee Young’s time of 51.24 was good enough to book her a place in her second consecutive World Championships semi-finals.

National champion Roshawn Clarke and Jaheel Hyde progressed to the semi-finals of the men’s 400m hurdles after strong outings. Clarke in his debut clocked 48.39 seconds to finish third while Jaheel Hyde was second in 48.63. Assinie Wilson, running in his first World Championships, did not finish his heat.

Meanwhile, national 1500m champion Adelle Tracey found joy in becoming the new national record-holder clocking 3:58.77 minutes despite finishing seventh in the semi-finals of the women’s 1500m.

Ackelia Smith’s best jump of 6.49m was not enough to get her three additional rounds as she finished ninth in the long jump final. Romaine Beckford’s World Championships debut in the high jump ended with his best effort being 2.22m, not enough to make the final. Samantha Hall could not find better luck in the women’s discus as her best effort of 58.43m did not get her through to the final.